Power of Generosity and receiving it humbly: Part II

PLEASE READ THE PREVIOUS ARTICLE ALONGWITH TOO!

Randomness is the evil: The effect of randomness is our surroundings are so weird that when we face untoward situations in life, we tend to look toward immediate effects to reason for the good and bad alike affecting our existence. While not everyone is concerned for the good parts, it is the bad parts which tend to make us consider the ‘why’ beneath such incidents. This ‘why’ is the randomness all around us, clouding us and making us gnawl and fester with rage without acknowledging the power of randomness to upturn the plans.

Businesses suffer from such randomness every minute, and this has more to do with the limited control we have over the randomness affecting people and positions to draw the most pertinent decisions. This is the power of randomness which is the cause of all evil in our lives and events. If Coronavirus weren’t a random exposure, a year of human activity could further push itself ahead. If we could exert control in a simulated fashion over every activity, the trajectory of future progress could be defined in clear and precise terms. Hence success lies in our ability to account for the effect of randomness and create alternate paths rather than be driven by conjecture.

Randomness is at the heart of all evolution. Hence it is truly evil? Our perception of what is good and the diametrically opposite as evil is a social construct. What pains one benefits the other. What causes misery to some brings joy and prosperity to the other, thanks to the boundaries we have drawn, be it social, economical or geographical. And randomness can turn tables any moment, forcing the slip between the cup and the lip. So, what is the rule to deal with this beast? One of them is to receive humbly whatever is bestowed to us with deep humility. And that brings us to the fourth and final rule of Discipline.

Discipline makes life bearable: Rudyard Kipling’s eternal lines in his poem ‘If’ mentions it most succinctly;

If you can meet with triumph and disaster

And treat those imposters just the same;

If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,

Or watch the things you gave your life to broken,

And stoop and build ’em up with wornout tools;

If randomness is the devil lurking in the shadows to upset every plan and success, it is the resolve of discipline to keep fighting back odds till randomness tires out and you keep walking down the same path without feeling pain and anguish for any particular person or thing, but rather know that the path cannot be abandoned if we are to meet with the end with the spirit of a spirited disciplinarian.

It is often the lack of discipline which keeps us a few feet away from our ambitions. The discipline to build a nest, or keep hunting is what keeps the birds fly and lions roar. The ability to keep striving isn’t an easy one, but what else does one give generously towards one’s own ambitions?

Is discipline hence the key rule to achieving one’s ambitions? The key rule of discipline is to be generous to one’s own self before anyone else. The keyword here is generous, not greed. Consider the simulated fantasy where everyone was disciplined about their own self. This would reduce a lot of problems, including poverty. It would require less efforts of creating products and services for others, as self-reliant humans, like most in the animal kingdom are, either would work for their own good in collaboration with others or remain content with whatever they received. I have written about it in earlier articles alongwith my book ‘Reasoning Our Choices’ and it would do good to read them if you are keen to understand the limited abilities we possess within definite boundaries to find our true purpose.

This is where the four pillars of life’s journey makes it exciting, gritty, fun and sweaty; one gives generously to the purpose, takes whatever is received graciously and does not misuse the power contained and obtained, cause it came from randomness and shalt wilt away with time randomly.

Author of Reasoning Our Choices and co-Founder, Pexitics.com & a passionate Leadership Coach

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